.NET Multi-platform App UI Overview

You can build anything with .NET. It’s one of the main reasons millions of developers choose .NET as the platform for their careers, and companies invest for their businesses. With .NET 5 we begin our journey of unifying the .NET platform, bringing .NET Core and Mono/Xamarin together in one base class library (BCL) and toolchain (SDK).

As we consider what building device applications will look like in a unified .NET, we see many devices across multiple platforms used, from Android and iOS to Windows and macOS. To address this need we are excited to announce a new first-class UI framework for doing just that: .NET Multi-platform App UI, affectionately call .NET MAUI.

Let us introduce you to what .NET MAUI is, the single project developer experience, modern development patterns, and a look at the journey ahead.

What is .NET MAUI

.NET MAUI is an evolution of the increasingly popular Xamarin.Forms toolkit that turns 6 years old this month. For years companies such as UPS, Ernst & Young, and Delta have been leveraging the mobile expertise of Xamarin atop .NET to power their businesses; some since the very beginning. It has also been very successful in helping small businesses maximize their development investment sharing upwards of 95% of their code, and beating their competitors to market. .NET MAUI extends this success on mobile to embrace the desktop making it the best way to build multi-platform applications across both, especially our new devices such as the new Surface Duo.

.NET MAUI simplifies the choices for .NET developers, providing a single stack that supports all modern workloads: Android, iOS, macOS, and Windows. The native features of each platform and UI control are within reach in a simple, cross-platform API for you to deliver no-compromise user experiences while sharing even more code than before.

Single Project Developer Experience

.NET MAUI is built with developer productivity in mind, including the project system and cross-platform tooling that developers need. .NET MAUI simplifies the project structure into a single project to target multiple platforms.

This means you can easily deploy to any target that you wish including your desktop, emulators, simulators, or physical devices with a single click. With built-in cross-platform resources you will be able to add any images, fonts, or translation files into the single project, and .NET MAUI will automatically setup native hooks so you can just code.

Finally, you will always have access the native underlying operating system APIs and it will be easier than ever with new platform specific integrations. Under platforms you can add source code files for a specific operating system and access the native APIs. With .NET MAUI everything is in one place where you need it to keep you productive.

MAUI: cross-platform development, simplified
MAUI: cross-platform development, simplified

This delivers:

  • One project targeting multiple platforms and devices
  • One location to manage resources such as fonts and images
  • Multi-targeting to organize your platform-specific code

You master one way to build client apps, the MAUI way, and all platforms are within your reach. Today, Scott Hanselman and I will demo it in action at Build, The Journey to One .NET.

Modern App Patterns

Part of the vision for one .NET is providing developer choice in the areas of personal preferences so you can be most productive using .NET. This manifests in which IDE you use whether Visual Studio 2019, Visual Studio for Mac, or even Visual Studio Code. .NET MAUI will be available in all of those, and support both the existing MVVM and XAML patterns as well as future capabilities like Model-View-Update (MVU) with C#, or even Blazor.

MVVM

Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) and XAML, the predominant pattern and practice among .NET developers for decades now, are first-class features in .NET MAUI. This will continue to grow and evolve to help make you productive building and maintaining production apps.

<StackLayout>
    <Label Text="Welcome to .NET MAUI!" />
    <Button Text="{Binding Text}" 
            Command="{Binding ClickCommand}" />
</StackLayout>
public Command ClickCommand { get; }

public string Text { get; set; } = "Click me";

int count = 0;

void ExecuteClickCommand ()
{
    count++;
    Text = $"You clicked {count} times.";
}

MVU

In addition, we are enabling developers to write fluent C# UI and implement the increasingly popular Model-View-Update (MVU) pattern. MVU promotes a one-way flow of data and state management, as well as a code-first development experience that rapidly updates the UI by applying only the changes necessary. For more information about MVU as a pattern, check out this Elm Programming guide and this blog from Thomas Bandt.

Below is a basic counter example in the MVU style written in .NET MAUI.

readonly State<int> count = 0;

[Body]
View body() => new StackLayout
{
    new Label("Welcome to .NET MAUI!"),
    new Button(
        () => $"You clicked {count} times.",
        () => count.Value ++)
    )
};

This pattern is ideally suited for hot reload as you can see below with added styling, gradients, and fonts with instant hot reload from C#.

MAUI: cross-platform development
MAUI: cross-platform development

Both MVVM and MVU deliver the same native applications, performance, and platform fidelity. Developers will be able to choose which style best suits their preference and use case.

By Enrico

My greatest passion is technology. I am interested in multiple fields and I have a lot of experience in software design and development. I started professional development when I was 6 years. Today I am a strong full-stack .NET developer (C#, Xamarin, Azure)

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